In Vitro Testing

In Vitro Testing for Cosmetics

To test the efficacy and toxicology of your raw materials or finished cosmetic products, we have developed alternative in vitro methods, as animal testing is forbidden since 2009. The QACS Laboratory methods look out for the wellbeing of animals, but are also highly sophisticated and reliable. Out tests have either already been validated or are in the process of being so.

Why in vitro testing is important

We use in vitro testing primarily in regulatory safety testing, but also in chemical and chemical product evaluation. In cosmetics we use it to estimate the efficacy and toxicology of your cosmetic products.

We further conduct in vitro testing to select and rank your chemicals during the development of new chemicals and products, and in toxicology research.

Which tests we perform

We offer a range of in vitro tests for XXX, to confirm the safety profile of your testing product.

EpiOcularTM (OCL-200-EIT)

This in vitro hazard assessment assay can differentiate materials that are ocular non-irritants from materials that are ocular irritants.

As part of the protocol, we apply the test substance on a non-keratinised epithelium, prepared from normal human keratinocytes.

The ability to expose the tissue topically is essential to model the same kind of progressive injury expected in vivo. It also allows both solid and liquid test materials to be applied directly to the tissue.

We determine cell viability after the application via MTT assay. For the final determination of cell viability we use the ELISA photometer.

A substance is classified as irritating if the mean cell viability of minimum 2 under test tissues is below 60% of the negative control.

EpiOcular ET-50

This in vitro test is based on the effective time at which a material (applied neat) causes a 50% reduction in tissue viability (ET-50).

Based on the ET-50% the test article is classified into 1 of 4 classifications, ranging from non-irritating, very mild, mild, moderate to severe/extreme. These correspond to groupings of Draize rabbit eye test scores (MMAS).

Certifications

The eye irritation tests have been:

  • Validated by ECVAM for substances and mixtures.
  • Certified as good laboratory practice (GLP).

We use the Bovine Corneal Opacity and Permeability test method (BCOP) as an alternative to the Draize rabbit eye test to identify:

  • Chemicals Inducing Serious Eye Damage
  • Chemicals Not Requiring Classification for Eye Irritation or Serious Eye Damage (OECD 437)

We conduct the test on isolated corneas from the eyes of cattle slaughtered for commercial purposes.

EpiDermTM (EPI-200-SIT)

We use the Reconstructed Human Epidermis Test Method (OECD 439). We apply the test substance in different conditions on reconstructed human epidermis (RhE).

We determine cell viability after the application via MTT assay. For the final determination of cell viability we use the ELISA photometer.

A substance is classified as irritating if the mean cell viability of minimum 3 under test tissues is below 50% of the negative control.

Certifications

The in vitro skin irritation test has:

  • Been validated by ECVAM as a reference method.
  • Received regulatory acceptance for substances and mixtures.
  • Been certified as good laboratory practice (GLP).

EpiDermTM (EPI-200-SCT)

We use the Reconstructed Human Epidermis Test Method (OECD 431). We expose the test substance topically to a reconstructed human epidermis (RhE) model and then conduct a cell viability test.

We measure cell viability by dehydrogenase conversion of MTT present in cell mitochondria, into a blue formazan salt that we quantitatively measure photometrically after extraction from tissues.

The skin corrosivity potential of the test materials is classified according to the remaining cell viability obtained after 3-minute or 1-hour exposure to the test chemical.

Certifications

The in vitro skin corrosion test has been validated by ECVAM as a reference method.

EpiAirwayTM 

We expose the test substance topically to an organotypic human airway tissue model (EpiAirway) to test for 3 hours. We then measure tissue viability IC75 (the dose required to reduce the EpiAirway culture viability to 75% of vehicle treated tissues).

We measure cell viability by dehydrogenase conversion of MTT present in cell mitochondria, into a blue formazan salt that we quantitatively measure photometrically after extraction from tissues.

We predict the inhalation irritation potential through the reduction of the average viability of 2 tissues exposed to test substance in comparison to the average viability of 2 negative controls (treated with sterile deionized water).

How much do the in vitro tests cost?

Fill in our contact form to request our price list and find out how our QACS Laboratory team can help you.